Latest research on Ezetimibe

Ezetimibe is an anti-hyperlipidemic medication which is used to lower cholesterol levels. Specifically, it appears to bind to a critical mediator of cholesterol absorption, the Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) protein on the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells as well as in hepatocytes.

Ezetimibe and alcohol

Associations between educational level and behavioral risk factors (smoking, obesity [BMI > 30 kg/m2], alcohol use, and adherence to allocated study treatment [simvastatin plus Ezetimibe or placebo]) were assessed using logistic regression models stratified by country or region of recruitment.17 [source, 2016]
The following variables were considered: age (≥70 years), female sex, family history of premature coronary heart disease, current smoking, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption (>2 units/week), body mass index ≥30 kg/m2, waist circumference (>102 cm in men, >88 cm in women), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg, equivalent Simvastatin dose (20–40 versus 5–10 mg/day), and treatment with Ezetimibe. [source, 2014]
Variables independently associated with dyslipidemia were assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis, with the following variables considered: age, sex, first-grade family history of premature CVD, current smoker, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption (> 2 units/week), BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 (i.e., obesity), waist circumference (> 102 cm in men, > 88 cm in women), history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg, Simvastatin equivalent dose of either 20 to 40 vs. 10 mg/day or > 40 mg vs. 10 mg/day and Ezetimibe. [source, 2014]
Usefulness of Ezetimibe in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease [58, 59] and hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation [60, 61] as well a slight beneficial effect on aminotransferase activities in our experiment indicated that potential results of an experiment with a rat group with diet-evoked hyperlipidemia may be extremely interesting. [source, 2014]
Another study demonstrated that Ezetimibe was effective for reducing serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels resistant to lifestyle intervention in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (7). [source, 2014]
Exclusion criteria were: hypersensitivity to Ezetimibe, consumption of phytosterol-enriched functional foods within one month before study entry, prior history of cardiovascular disease, secondary hypercholesterolemia, renal insufficiency (defined by a glomerular filtration rate (MDRD) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2), increased transaminase levels (defined by 5 times above the upper level of normality), concomitant treatment for hepatitis virus coinfections, diabetes mellitus, active illicit drug or alcohol abuse, AIDS-defining opportunistic infection within 3 months prior to study entry, any acute illness within one month prior to study entry, and pregnancy or breastfeeding. [source, 2014]
In humans, Ezetimibe shows favorable effects on fatty liver in obese subjects on a weight loss diet [52], patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and dyslipidemia [53] and nonobese participants with NAFLD [54]. [source, 2013]
Variables independently associated with dyslipidaemia were evaluated with logistic regression modelling using the following variables: age (≥ 70 years), female gender, family history of premature coronary heart disease (CHD), current tobacco smoker, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption (> 2 units/week), body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2, large waist circumference (> 102 cm in men, > 88 cm in women29), hypertension, DM, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg, Simvastatin equivalent dose of either 20 to 40 versus 10 mg/day, or > 40 mg versus 10 mg/day, Ezetimibe use, and physician’s specialty (cardiologist, endocrinologist, diabetologist, internal medicine or other). [source, 2013]
This study excluded pregnant women; patients with genetic disorders; patients on other concurrent lipid lowering agents such as bile acid sequestrants (Cholestyramine, colesevelam), Niacin, Ezetimibe, Fenofibrate and/or omega 3; patients with previous history of angina, severe vascular disease, or other life threatening disease; patients with nephropathy and/or hypothyroidism, active liver disease, bile duct problems, or ALT > 3 × ULN; patients with creatine kinase levels > 10 × ULN; patients taking concurrent corticosteroids, Ciclosporin, and/or hormone replacement therapy; patients who are physically inactive; patients with a history of drug or alcohol abuse. [source, 2013]
Interestingly, children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have higher fetuin A levels, and in adults, treatment with Pioglitazone or Ezetimibe seems to decrease fetuin A levels and liver fat simultaneously [13]–[15]. [source, 2012]